11th of the 11th

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Janey Dal
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11th of the 11th

Post by Janey Dal » Sun Nov 12, 2017 12:15 pm

Hi guys

I watched the remembrance service this morning on TV as I do every year.

Every year it saddens me that whilst we pay such a moving tribute to the men and women who have died for the country I am always left with a feeling that it isn’t enough.

I fully understand that there is nothing else we can do and it is very important.

BUT! Watching Tony Blair attending and laying a wreath made me so damned angry! I have no idea how he can show his face. He is responsible for so many unnecessary deaths of our young service people. He should hang his head in shame.

If one of my children had died as a result of his lies I don’t think I could keep quiet.

Just my own little rant at a man I despise for his Empire-building and sucking up to the US!

Hugs (but none for Blair)

Jane 😘

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MikeyB
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Re: 11th of the 11th

Post by MikeyB » Sun Nov 12, 2017 3:56 pm

Exactly the same could be said of the lunatics that started the First World War, without which we would never have had the Second.

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Janey Dal
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Re: 11th of the 11th

Post by Janey Dal » Mon Nov 13, 2017 2:00 pm

Oh don’t you start! :P :P

If we watch anything about WW1 I have to listen to Alan ranting about the upper classes, generals with no idea of battle tactics, eejits, etc etc!

He is absolutely right of course.

I just find Blair obnoxious, self-serving and smug. Mind his wife is ugly so he hasn't got it all his own way. He has to look at that every morning when he wakes up :lol: :lol: .

It’s a fitting penance.

Hugs

Jane 😘

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Re: 11th of the 11th

Post by 26.12.11 » Thu Nov 16, 2017 12:49 am

I went to Ypres a couple of years ago. The last post ceremony at the Menin Gate is very moving.
In my family my great great uncle Billy died 17 Sept 1917 one of the battles of the Somme and is buried in Corbie cemetery France.
My maternal grandfather was a Sherwood Forester and was very lucky to come home, out of his battalion of 96 only 4 did. He was standing by a barn that was hit by a mortar and it fell on him but in doing so saved him from the trenches.
When they carted him off the a field hospital they found a bullet lodged into his great coat that should have killed him but the falling barn slowed it’s trajectory. He owed a lot to that barn. His brother also survived but he seemed to have been a bit gung ho. He transferred to flame throwers then tanks. Another great great uncle never left Scotland as he looked down the wrong end of a flame thrower and burned his eye (don’t know if he did it deliberately to get out of going to fight)
My brother is writing a book about on family history of the fallen honoured on our local memorial.

With proud thanksgiving, a mother for her children,
England mourns for her dead across the sea.
Flesh of her flesh they were, spirit of her spirit,
Fallen in the cause of the free.

Solemn the drums thrill: Death august and royal
Sings sorrow up into immortal spheres.
There is music in the midst of desolation
And a glory that shines upon our tears.

They went with songs to the battle, they were young,
Straight of limb, true of eye, steady and aglow.
They were staunch to the end against odds uncounted,
They fell with their faces to the foe.

They shall grow not old, as we that are left grow old:
Age shall not weary them, nor the years condemn.
At the going down of the sun and in the morning
We will remember them.

They mingle not with their laughing comrades again;
They sit no more at familiar tables of home;
They have no lot in our labour of the day-time;
They sleep beyond England's foam.

But where our desires are and our hopes profound,
Felt as a well-spring that is hidden from sight,
To the innermost heart of their own land they are known
As the stars are known to the Night;

As the stars that shall be bright when we are dust,
Moving in marches upon the heavenly plain,
As the stars that are starry in the time of our darkness,
To the end, to the end, they remain.
Robert Laurence Binyon 1914
Sharon

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MikeyB
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Re: 11th of the 11th

Post by MikeyB » Thu Nov 16, 2017 4:06 pm

That is one of the best anti-War poems, though it is often unduly perceived as praise of the nobility of war. That is why only a part is used in the Remembrance service, and refers as much to soldiers of all nations, not just our lot. Binyon was a Quaker, War was anathema. He died in 1943, no doubt just as dismayed by Round 2.

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Re: 11th of the 11th

Post by Bob1955 » Thu Nov 16, 2017 7:46 pm

You do realise I will now have to google " anathema" :(

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paul.m
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Re: 11th of the 11th

Post by paul.m » Fri Nov 17, 2017 6:28 am

We did a WW1 battle field tour stayed in Ypres just around corner of Menin Gate . The war graves commission do a wonderful job ,to understand the waste of life a visit to the cemetery near Passendale is unbelievable just row after row of graves .Visited a German cemetery which was just a corner in a field even though there were thousands buried there ( Germany had to buy the land for there soldiers ).
My Great uncle is buried in France he was unlucky as he was injured and sent to Scotland to recover but army mucked up his leave so never got chance to see his mother before being sent back . Died 5 days before end of war with Spanish Flu .
Paul

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Janey Dal
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Re: 11th of the 11th

Post by Janey Dal » Sun Nov 19, 2017 12:07 pm

That is such a fabulous poem Sharon. I don’t think I’ve ever seen it in full before, although I am very aware of the part about ‘at the going down of the sun...” which is quoted in ever remembrance service.

It breaks my heart every time I hear it.

I have been to Normandy and seen the war graves. I have seen what is left of the Bailey bridges that are still on the sea shore. It is very moving.

I have found that the Normandians are very friendly to the Brits (unlike a lot of French people) and I wonder if it is as a result of the Normandy landings?

I genuinely think that all school children should have ‘Saving Private Ryan” as part of their school curriculum. The first scenes are so graphic that it should make a significant point to young minds that war is never the answer and never will be.

The trouble is that I grew up in the 60s when we were still crowing about winning the war, having parents who lived through it. We should never crow about winning a war, because there are no winners other than the heads of the state with the most money to provide the weaponry to come first.

hugs

Jane 😘

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MikeyB
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Re: 11th of the 11th

Post by MikeyB » Sun Nov 19, 2017 4:23 pm

I grew up in the fifties. When I was born, there was still rationing of sugar. That’s all the folk remembered. The rationing. Bombing was sparse in rural Lancashire. I don’t recall any crowing about winning the war, just comics and bubble gum cards showing racist scenes of evil japs and nasty Germans. As I recall the sixties, it was more about forgetting the war, getting on with living and worrying about “the bomb”, the only weapon ever invented where collateral damage is the sole intent.

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stuart13
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Re: 11th of the 11th

Post by stuart13 » Mon Nov 20, 2017 9:52 pm

I was born whilst the war was on and the nearest that I came to it, so I'm told, is about 1/2 mile, when a V1 took out 2 houses from the middle of a terrace. Apparently mum and I used to hide under the stairs when the Luftwaffe was overhead. When houses were blown up by a bomb blast, the only thing left standing was the stairs. :roll:

I don't remember any shortages, we just ate what we were given. What you've never had you never miss.

:)

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MikeyB
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Re: 11th of the 11th

Post by MikeyB » Fri Nov 24, 2017 10:19 am

Didn’t know they had V1s in the First World War. You learn something every day on this forum :D

26.12.11
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Re: 11th of the 11th

Post by 26.12.11 » Fri Nov 24, 2017 12:20 pm

:lol: :lol: :lol:
Sharon

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stuart13
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Re: 11th of the 11th

Post by stuart13 » Fri Nov 24, 2017 1:29 pm

MikeyB wrote:
Fri Nov 24, 2017 10:19 am
Didn’t know they had V1s in the First World War. You learn something every day on this forum :D
:P

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Janey Dal
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Re: 11th of the 11th

Post by Janey Dal » Sat Nov 25, 2017 1:13 pm

:lol: :lol: :lol:

My dad was in a reserved occupation (a railway carriage and wagon builder) so was excused conscription.

He did however decide to sign up for the RAF. Luckily for us all the war finished before he did any active service or, just think, I may not have been here at all. :shock: :shock: .

Actually whilst I was obviously joking, it just proves the adage about the butterfly’s wing.....

I wasn’t even around when the war finished but if it hadn't finished when it did I may never have existed. And then none of you would have read Alan’s blog and think how that would have affected you :shock: :shock: :lol: :lol: .

Ooh! I feel all spooky now :shock: :shock: :lol: :lol: .

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